Essay

Essay

I do not have a paper to upload. Please forgive me For hundreds of years, military forces have used music to signal their troops.[1] The use of musical signalling in modern armed forces retains an important place in diplomatic protocol and military courtesy and figures centrally in the conduct of official events such as state funerals, military parades, naval christening, officer commissioning, armed forces promotion ceremonies, and other ritual occurrences.

Unlike other English-speaking nations, United States military band ceremonial music is not largely drawn from British military customs but is, rather, a mix of original styles and compositions and - to a lesser extent - French traditions. At the outset of the American Revolution, United States military units primarily relied on fife and drum corps for musical support. Americans were first introduced to the bugle horn (forerunner to the modern bugle) during the Battle of Harlem Heights, when British infantry used the instrument, causing Joseph Reed to later recall, "the enemy appeared in open view, and sounded their bugles in a most insulting manner, as is usual after a fox chase. I never felt such a sensation before—it seemed to crown our disgrace."[2] Some American cavalry units adopted bugle horns during the war, however, a shortage of brass in the Thirteen Colonies largely limited use of the instrument to the opposing British and German forces, with American troops continuing to rely heavily on fifes, drums, and even - at the Battle of Saratoga - turkey calls.

The modern bugle was first introduced to American military units around the time of the War of 1812.[3] During that conflict, only the Rifle Regiment was authorized to use the bugle. All other American forces were required to continue using the traditional American fife. Gradually, however, bugles became more widely adopted by the United States military. American bugle calls have largely been based on early French bugle calls (the notable...

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