history of britain

history of britain

History secondary evidence
3 phases of evacuation: 3.5 million people mainly children, had experienced evacuation by the end of WW2.
1. At the station- Children had labels attached to them, as though they were parcels. They stood at railway neither stations not knowing where they were going nor if they would be split from brothers and sisters who had gathered with them.
2. On arrival- The children arrived in the countryside, tired, hungry and uncertain whether they would ever see their families again. They were taken to the village hall, where they would be met by the billeting officer (the person in charge of finding them homes).
3. A ‘pick- you –own evacuee’ sessions would then take place, where host families haggled over the most presentable children while the sicklier and grubbier children were left until last.
Britain split into 3 zones:
1. Evacuation- areas where heavy bombing was expected.
2. Neutral- areas that would not need to send or receive evacuees.
3. Reception- rural areas where evacuees would be sent.

Blitz: The Blitz is the title given to the German bombing campaign on British cities during World War Two. However, the term ‘Blitz’ is more commonly used for the bombing campaign against London. After the failure of the Battle of Britain, the Germans attempted to bomb London into submission and to lower morale– a tactic used again with the V weapons campaign in 1944-45.


Social effects:

Long term-effects:
There were many short and long-term effects of the Blitz. After the Blitz, more than 2,000,000 people were left homeless; sixty percent in London. 60,000 people died during the Blitz. Many historical and famous buildings were damaged including St. Paul’s Cathedral, The City Library in London along with about a million books, The British Museum, the Houses of Parliament, and St. James’s Palace.

Other factors:

Conscription: In October 1939 the British government announced that all men aged...

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