Maestro - Speech

Maestro - Speech

  • Submitted By: gwner
  • Date Submitted: 05/27/2015 8:09 PM
  • Category: English
  • Words: 648
  • Page: 3


Good morning class,

The novel Maestro by Peter Goldsworthy amply demonstrates the idea of growing up is fraught with obstacles. However it is often internal obstacles rather than external that stand in the way of our development. This is certainly the case for Paul Crabbe, whose initial arrogance slows his movement towards maturity. At first, Paul is quick to judge and stereotype, and has an inflated opinion of himself. It is largely through the role-modelling and guidance of his teacher, Eduard Keller, that he finally develops into a sensitive and thoughtful human being.

At the beginning of the novel, Goldsworthy presents us with a young, immature and arrogant Paul. He is quick to judge others, his first impression of Keller as the town drunk with "…pitted, sun-coarsened skin - a cheap ruined leather…" and his "…wobbling, jelly…" eyes. The unflattering metaphors emphasise Paul's insensitivity and tendency to stereotype others portray Paul’s immaturity at the start of the story. As piano lessons continue Paul’s immaturity is further shown when Keller refuses to let Paul play the piano, Paul shouts “I want to play” but keller refuses to let Paul. This causes Paul to run out in tears from the lesson.

Through Kellers piano lesson Keller teachers Paul to go beyond stereotypes and look beyond superficial beauty and instead look for nuances and subtly and feelings. At the beginning of the book Paul sees those who clap as “plebs”, uncultured rednecks. Through Kellers lessons paul begins to see through these stereotypes he has set for other people. Paul learns to look past judging people when he first meets them and instead is much more open and mature by the end of the story.

Paul changes his thoughts on Keller throughout the story, in the beginning of the story when Paul first meets Keller, Paul is young and immature and calls Keller a “Nazi” which upsets his father, by the end of the story Paul is a much more grown up and matured person and...

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