Life Is Fine by Langston Hughes
I went down to the river,
I set down on the bank.
I tried to think but couldn't,
So I jumped in and sank.

I came up once and hollered!
I came up twice and cried!
If that water hadn't a-been so cold
I might've sunk and died.

But it was Cold in that water! It was cold!

I took the elevator
Sixteen floors above the ground.
I thought about my baby
And thought I would jump down.

I stood there and I hollered!
I stood there and I cried!
If it hadn't a-been so high
I might've jumped and died.

But it was High up there! It was high!

So since I'm still here livin',
I guess I will live on.
I could've died for love--
But for livin' I was born

Though you may hear me holler,
And you may see me cry--
I'll be dogged, sweet baby,
If you gonna see me die.

Life is fine! Fine as wine! Life is fine!

Autobiography- James Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902. It was in Lincoln, Illinois, that Hughes began writing poetry. In November 1924, he moved to Washington, D.C. Hughes's first book of poetry, The Weary Blues, was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1926. In 1930 his first novel, Not without Laughter, won the Harmon gold medal for literature. He is particularly known for his colorful portrayals of black life in America from the 1920-1960’s. He wrote novels, short stories and plays, as well as poetry.

Analyzing- This poem is saying that someone has dived completely into love and has gone cold while doing it. Now he stops to think about his baby and wants to jump. Instead he decides that he is born to live so he doesn’t jump.

Why I choose this poem? : I choose this poem because the title caught my attention and made me want to read on.

A Life by Sylvia Plath
Touch it: it won't shrink like an eyeball,
This egg-shaped bailiwick, clear as a tear.
Here's yesterday, last year ---
Palm-spear and lily distinct as flora in the vast
Windless threadwork of a tapestry.

Flick the glass with your...