Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology

  • Submitted By: lavalw79
  • Date Submitted: 02/04/2014 2:41 PM
  • Category: Psychology
  • Words: 16321
  • Page: 66
  • Views: 1

The Meaning and Measure of Happiness
CHAPTER OUTLINE Why a Psychology of Well-Being? Objective versus Subjective Measures Negative versus Positive Functioning What is Happiness? Two Traditions Hedonic Happiness Eudaimonic Happiness Focus on Research: Positive Affect and a Meaningful Life Subjective Well-Being:The Hedonic Basis of Happiness Measuring Subjective Well-Being Life Satisfaction Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Happiness Focus on Research: Is Your Future Revealed in Your Smile? Issues in the Study of Affect Global Measures of Happiness Reliability and Validity of Subjective Well-Being Measures Experience Sampling Method Focus on Method: How Do We Spend Our Time? The Day Reconstruction Method Experience Sampling versus Global Measures of Subjective Well-Being Self-Realization:The Eudaimonic Basis of Happiness Psychological Well-Being and Positive Functioning Emotional Well-Being Psychological Well-Being Social Well-Being Need Fulfillment and Self-Determination Theory Focus on Research: What Makes a “Good” Day? Comparing Hedonic and Eudaimonic Views of Happiness Definition and Causes of Happiness and Well-Being Complementarity and Interrelationship


n this chapter, we begin an exploration of psychology’s answer to some ancient questions. What is a good life? What is a life worth living? What is the basis for happiness that endures beyond short-term pleasures? The ancient Greeks contemplated the answers to these questions. Is a good life built on maximizing pleasures and minimizing pain, as the hedonic

ISBN 1-256-51557-4

Positive Psychology, by Steve R. Baumgardner and Marie K. Crothers. Published by Prentice Hall. Copyright © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Chapter 2 • The Meaning and Measure of Happiness


philosophy of the Epicureans prescribed? Minimizing pain, as the Stoics believed? Or is happiness to be found in the expression of the true self, or daimon, as described by Aristotle’s eudaimonic view of happiness?...

Similar Essays