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Ted Hughes

Ted Hughes

  • Submitted By: asdfghjklyn
  • Date Submitted: 10/05/2013 9:13 PM
  • Category: English
  • Words: 1936
  • Page: 8
  • Views: 2

Lady Lazarus:

Plath’s Ariel collection has been interpreted as the charting of Plath's increasing desperation for death, her meaning exemplified in her use of strong imagery.
She uses the imagery ‘Bright as a Nazi lampshade’ to describe her exterior, which veils the suicidal tyrant that dominates her. She juxtaposes this horrific imagery and metaphor with an softer more subdues metaphor, "a featureless, fine, Jew linen," to illustrate her face, which is the vulnerable victim of her suicidal tyrant. This representation of the Holocaust exemplifies how she inflicts, like the Nazis, her desire for destruction upon her body.
The conflicting perspectives are evident in her form which is framed by her two personas, the Nazis and the Jews. The poem acts as a metaphor that possesses a macabre perspective through its illustration of Plath’s psych.
‘Out of the ash I rise with my red hair and I eat men like air’, she grows stronger from her death like a Phoenix, she is feministic. Recently after this poem she successfully committed suicide.


Daddy:

In ‘Daddy’, Sylvia presents her personal perspective of her Father’s impact on her personality and relationships through a confessional poem
In the first sector of the poem she continues the theme of the holocaust, establishing the morbid meaning behind her representation of male relationships.
The Title ‘daddy’ has positive connotations, the title misconstrues. However Plath immediately strongly contrasts with her opening line, ‘you do not do, you do not do.’
constructs the first stanza to be deceptively alike to nursery rhyme, ‘achoo achoo’, this sense of security is immediately incongruent with the horrific imagery of ‘Dachau, Auschwitz, Belsen,’ here form is used to cause emotional change in the responder and allow them to gain a deeper understanding through the portrayal her young unconditional love and her gradual mature comparison of her father to a ‘nazi’, ‘devil’, and ‘vampire’. This change of emotion...

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