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The Behavior in Human Nature

The Behavior in Human Nature

  • Submitted By: ruan93
  • Date Submitted: 03/11/2010 10:25 PM
  • Category: Psychology
  • Words: 516
  • Page: 3
  • Views: 704

In this study by Trandis, H., Bontempo, R., Villareal, M., and Lucca, N. was conducted in the year 1988 set out to prove that behavior in human nature emphasizes on external, environmental forces to enter the ultimate definition of who you are. They believed that culture had a very big influence on personality and set out to prove that personality comes either from an individualistic or collectivist cultures. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate his individualism-collectivism theory by making two lists that defined each culture. The researchers had a total of three separate studies to report this article. In the first study 300 undergraduate psychology students at University of Chicago were given a questionnaire with 158 items to measure the tendencies of collectivist and individualistic behaviors and beliefs. In the second study, it set out to answer the question, “Do people in collectivist cultures indicate more willingness to subordinate their personal needs to the needs of the group?” To avoid any biases in this study the questionnaire was translated into Spanish and Japanese so the participants consisted of 91 Chicago University undergraduates, 97 Puerto Rican and 150 Japanese undergraduate students, and 106 older Japanese individuals. A 144 question test designed to measure collectivist characteristics was given to participants. In the third study, another questionnaire with 72 items with mixed collectivist and individualistic factors were given to 100 participants equally divided by sex between the University of Chicago and Puerto Rico.
In the results for the first study, they found that individualistic cultures tend to include more concern of one’s own goals rather than the ingroup goals, less attention to the ingroup goals. The results of the second study showed that collectivist cultures tend to sacrifice more for their ingroups and feel more honor towards their whole group rather than themselves as singles. Traindis found these out by...

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