The Day I Left for Thehills

The Day I Left for Thehills

  • Submitted By: trinidad
  • Date Submitted: 02/09/2010 2:42 PM
  • Category: Biographies
  • Words: 257
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Employee seniority had little bearing on computer use. Employees in permanent jobs were much more
likely to use computers than workers in temporary, casual or seasonal work. Relatively few selfemployed
individuals used computers. Proportionately more fulltime employees than parttime employees used
computers. Large firms had far more employees using computers than small firms.
As already mentioned, managers and administrators are in the hightech group of occupations. The 1989
GSS asked two questions to further probe computer use among managers and supervisors. Employed
respondents were asked: "Which of the following best describes the work you do? Is it managerial,
supervisory or neither?" Respondents who indicated that their work was managerial were then asked:
"Would you say that you are in a top-, upper-, middle- or lower-management position?" Managerial and
supervisory employees were more likely to use computers than their subordinates. However, within
management ranks, individuals at middle or lower levels were bigger users than those further up the
hierarchy.
To summarize: secure, fulltime jobs; supervisory or lower- and middle-management positions; and jobs
file:///N|/LHSBR/LHSAD/PERSPECT/Pe9124.htm (4 of 15) [6/1/01 9:45:31 AM]
Computers in the workplace (IS 912 A4)
in large organizations had significantly higher than average rates of computer use. This amplifies the
Economic Council of Canada's recent distinction between "good jobs" and "bad jobs" in the service
economy showing that good jobs are also more computer based. (8) As further evidence, individuals
making progress in their careers, by virtue of having been promoted in the previous