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The Effects of Dancehall Music on the Jamaican Society

The Effects of Dancehall Music on the Jamaican Society

Dancehall debate goes overseas
Published: Monday | February 23, 2009

Janet Silvera, Senior Gleaner Writer
[pic]
Sharon Gordon (left) and Carlyle McKetty
Correction/Clarification
In a story published in The Gleaner on Monday, February 23 titled ‘Dancehall debate goes overseas’, Sharon Gordon was incorrectly named Sandra Gordon and Carlyle McKetty was wrongly identified as Carlyle McKitty.
The Gleaner regrets the error.
WESTERN BUREAU:
As the effects of dancehall music take centre stage, reggae and brand Jamaica's vulnerability will capture the spotlight at a community forum in New York tagged 'Could dancehall be the ruination of reggae and by extension, brand Jamaica?'
Being pushed by the Coalition to Preserve Reggae music (CPR), in association with ZYNC TV, New York, the event takes place on Wednesday, March 4, at the historic Billie Holiday Theatre at Restoration Plaza, 1368 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
CPR's Sharon Gordon and Carlyle McKetty are convinced that dancehall is in a position to undercut reggae music and help to further damage the Jamaican brand. They say, "instead of a music portraying truths, rights, love and respect, we see a popular sound that is demeaning, hateful, destructive and downward vulgar".
Preposterous statement
However, this statement is already being rejected by one of the billed panellists, VP Records' Cristy Barber as the most preposterous statement she has ever heard.
Barber, who has worked with eight labels, including Tuff Gong, Capitol, Island and Colombia, says that even though she doesn't want to start the debate outside the forum, dancehall is a fabulous genre of music and reggae remains the most popular in the world.
"What these artistes are singing about is no different from what they are exposed to," she said.
Critiquing what is shown on the "explicit television news" in Jamaica, she said what is shown would never appear on television in the United States.
"Instead of not showing a...

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