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60 Free Essays on Shylock Speech

  1. Merchant of Venice Rhetorical Analysis

    in the audience, when giving a speech to support his claim that he is entitled to regard the Christians with the same ill-treatment they have shown him. Shylock, the speaker, is a Jewish moneylender in Venice, who is depicted as greedy, self-centered, and aloof. He has been discriminated against...

  2. Shakespeare, a Gifted Writer

    keep Shylock a simple one-dimensional character, a crude stereotype, he never would have included this speech. Unfortunately, immediately following this speech, Shylock makes a speech to Tubal that can change the audience's perspective of Shylock. He tell Tubal that he wishes his daughter were dead and...

  3. Merchant of Venice

    Antonio by structuring the dialog between these two main characters in poetry. Furthermore the level of hatred that Shylocks possesses towards the Christians can be evidence from Shylocks aside speech to the audience. “If………bear him.” The “ancient grudge” in this case being that Antonio is a Christian...

  4. Critical Essay: 'the Merchant of Venice' by Shakespeare - Shylock Character Study

    gains, scorned my nation, thwarted My bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine Enemies- and what is his reason? I am a Jew..’ In this speech Shylock argues that Jews and Christians have the same needs and experience the same emotions including the desire for revenge. In Belmont, Portia...

  5. english litearature

    respectfulness or the request for equal treatment dating all the way back to Shakespeare time. A famous speech in “ The merchant of Venice,” is the Hath not a Jew eyes speech in act 3 scene l, lines 57-72. In this speech Shylock argues that he should receive exact same treatment as the Christians, because they...

  6. The Merchant of Venice

    , is a Venetian named Bassanio. The scene returns to Venice, where Bassanio visits a Jewish moneylender, Shylock, and persuades him to lend the 3,000 ducats. Antonio has agreed to be bound for him in case of forfeiture. Antonio and Shylock despise each other: Antonio, because Shylock lends...

  7. The Merchant of Venice

    because Antonio hates him for being Jewish. Shylock then gives a beautiful speech in defense of the humanity of Jews, including the well-known lines, "if you prick us, do we not bleed?" He concludes that a Jew is not unlike a Christian, and a Christian in this situation would seek revenge. Therefore...

  8. Merchant of Venice

    to justify his own practices. His speech reveals a cold and calculating mind, reflective of his narrow thinking. He is also literal-minded and pragmatic and has quick and agile thought processes, which help him in his business dealings. Shylock suffers from religious persecution, which plays an...

  9. Merchant of Venice (Coursework)

    " speech. In this speech sympathy is felt the most as Shylock tells the audience of the discrimination he has been put through by Antonio and the Christians, explaining that "He hath disgraced me, and Hindered me half a million –laughed at my losses, Mocked at my gains, scorned my nation...

  10. The People

    was to Judaism and not to their Christianity. Shylock remarks that "Suffrance is the badge of all our tribe," and nowadays this would certainly seem stoic and shows that Shylock has humbly resigned himself to the role of the oppressed. Shylock's speech shows that he does not complain and wallow in...

  11. Shylock

    ducats rather than his daughter, and by demanding his pound of flesh, Shylock fits perfectly into the mold of the villain. Shakespeare captured his humanity in the play, especially in Shylock's famous speech which begins “Hath not a Jew eyes?...If you prick us, do we not bleed?” The speech is...

  12. Shylock Mechant of Venice

    . Although he’s treated so unfairly and so despised by everyone, in the court, Shylock is still brave enough to give the powerful speech. “I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? ……If you poison us, do we not die?” The meaning why Shakespeare had created Shylock this character is still very debatable. Some...

  13. Rabindranath tagore

    Christian's hate toward the Jews. Although the Christians consistently dehumanize Shylock, probably much to the delight of the Elizabethan audience, Shakespeare gives him a voice. If Shakespeare did not intend for Shylock to be human, he would not have given Shylock his speech is Act III, Scene i: Hath...

  14. The Merchant of Venice Was Anti Semetic

    lines Shylock defends himself as best he can and his case in being human is believable. Shakespeare in this speech utilizes words like “senses” and “affection” and “passions” to seemingly create empathy for Shylock in his speech. He states nothing that a normal human would not do or want to do. This...

  15. Ferf

    however after further research and understanding of Shylocks character and the oppression he faces in the monologue the speech is more than an appeal it’s as well as a form of persuasion to exploit the ignorance of the Christians and wants to show the common characteristics between the Jew’s and the...

  16. Who Is More of a Villain? Shylock or Antonio?

    provides more evidence towards the conclusion that Shylock, is in fact a villain. Victim: Some events and phrases change the fact that Shylock is a villain. For example, when Antonio approaches Shylock to request a loan, Shylock expresses his thoughts. This is a quote from his speech, “In the...

  17. The Merchant of Venice: Hath Not a Jew Mercy?

    reason he gives of why he hates Antonio is because he is a Christian. (I. iii. 43) This to the sixteenth century audience would be unreasonable, and this would evoke a sort of villainy towards Shylock. But a few moments later, the audience witnesses Shylock's speech about Antonio's abuses towards...

  18. The Merchant of Venice

    Christians, who he loathes. Shakespeare did make some attempt to engage the audience’s sympathy with Shylock. The modern audience will feel sympathy towards Shylock after his speech in Act three Scene one where Shylock states : “Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs...

  19. Jews

    his daughter running away with a Christian. The speech that Shylock makes is about how Jews and Christians are exactly the same as human beings he is trying to explain that Jews should get their own fair justice since they are like the Christians in every way except religion. “……… I am a Jew...

  20. Shylock Speech & Analysis

    “Hath not a Jews eyes” (III.i.49-61) Shylock, the main character, is depicted as a weasel who grotesquely demands a "pound of flesh" in the “name of friendship.” Characterized as one who fits the stereotypical Jew; he therefore, in an exaggerated form, loans money and meddles in usury. His...

  21. Merchant of Venice

    the fact that his daughter is gone. In Shylocks famous speech “Hath not a Jew eyes” is a powerful speech. He exposes the hypocrisy of the Christian characters that are always talking about love and mercy but then go their own way and make Shylock feel isolated because he is Jewish and different. If...

  22. Merchant of Venice

    disgraced me, and hindered me half a million,” Shylock later says this about Antonio, “laugh’s at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my Nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated mine enemies, and what’s his reason? I am a Jew.” Shylock’s most famous speech throughout the entire...

  23. How Far Is Shylock a Character for Whom We Can Feel Sympathy?

    How far is Shylock a character for whom we can feel sympathy? How would a contemporary audience's response to him differ from that of an audience in Shakespeare's time? Shylock isn't a character for whom we can feel much sympathy for because he always seems to be thinking about himself and his...

  24. Shylock

    An Inhumane and Irrational Shylock Shylock, in Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, embodies emotion unfettered by moral or intellectual constraints. Shylocks' speech at the beginning of act four, scene one emphasizes this point as the Duke and Antonio call upon both Shylocks' empathetic and...

  25. Merchant of Venice - Casting directors book merchant of venice

    simply faces anti Semitism because of his race. In his famous speech “Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands?” We begin to understand that Shylock was always looked down upon merely because he was a Jew. Shylock is considered both a minor character and a major character. I feel as though Shakespeare...

  26. Merchant of Venice

    play, although he does not lose his life, he loses everything of meaning to him. The idea of Shylock being a tragic figure is emphasised in his "hath not a Jew eyes" speech which indeed redeems him, however the speech ends revengefully with "if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?" I believe that...

  27. The Battle Between Cgristianity and Judaism

    . This speech is imperative in the characterization of Shylock. Jews are commonly stereotyped as misers, and Shylock possesses this trait. Shylock also states his desire for revenge on Antonio. The way a scene is directed and performed makes an enormous impact on the audiences understanding of...

  28. Shylock Presnation

    clear image that Shylock is a religious Jewish man Shylock shows repetition in first part Act 1 scene three. Shylock repeats the words after Bassanio "For three months" Shylock repeats "For three months, well". Shakespeare uses repetition in Shylock's speech to make him more mysteries. By copying...

  29. Discuss the Moral Issues Raised in ‘the Merchant of Venice’

    bond. It is followed with portia's speech, which outlines the idea of mercy. Shylocks answer to her illustrates his desire for revenge and Bassanio’s comments highlight the issue of friendship. Portia’s character is introduced when she intervenes on Antonio’s behalf, disguised as a man of law...

  30. Merchant of Venice Questions Act 4

    speech on mercy, but Shylock ignores it and demands the contract be fulfilled. Portia then asks if no one has been able to repay the amount, but since Shylock has refused the money there is nothing she can do to make him take it. She comments that she must therefore side with Shylock. What is...