Dead Poets Society Analyse

Dead Poets Society Analyse

´╗┐Analyse of filmen Dead Poets Society

The story takes place on an unconventional New England prep school, Welton, in the winter. You know that because it started to snow. The film is from around the late 40's or the 50's as you can see on the clothes, and the cars in it.

The film is about a new Welton-teacher, Mr. Keating, who inspires his students, at the age of 16-17, with poems and encourages them to seize the day. At Mr. Keatings first day with his class, he tells the students to rip out the first chapter in their teaching-book (because he didn't like that it gave characters on poems). He also tells his students to call him "O Captain, my Captain". The students didn't really understand Mr. Keating and his philosophy, but they easily accepted it, because it gave them more freedom than in the other courses. They often read poems in Mr. Keatings class, and one time they had to write one themselves. Everybody did, some seriously and some not. Except Todd. Mr. Keating then made Todd yawp in front of the whole class! One day some of the boys found a yearbook from the time Mr. Keating was a student on the same school. Under his picture it was written something about the DPS. The boys asked Mr. Keating what it was, and he told them about the secret meetings he and other boys, at that time, had in a cave in the forest. There they read poems to each other at night. They had called it for the Dead Poets Society, DPS. At that time, Mr. Keating had become an idol for the students, and the boys restarted the Dead Poets Society, and Neil was the leader. Everybody read poems without Todd. Charlie played the saxophone. One of the boys, Knox, was in love with a girl, Chris, he met under a family-dinner with an other family. He called her, went to football matches to see her and even to a party where her boyfriend was, he tried to make a move on her. It ended happily between them, going hand in hand.
Neil became obsessed with acting, and tried to get a part in the...

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