environmental degradation

environmental degradation

´╗┐Environmental degradation is one of the largest threats that are being looked at in the world today. The United Nation International Strategy For Disasters Reduction characterizes environmental degradation as the lessening of the limit of the earth to meet social and environmental destination and needs. After the industrial revolution, global development took a larger dimension and the necessities of the society covered a wider spectrum. When economic systems went into overdrive, there was a massive increase in resource use and pollution. It used to be confined to local and regional areas but now this is occurring via global scale. These changes are down to human activity not natural variability. The rapid pace of progress neglects the need to preserve the environment. When the pinnate of development has been reached, society finds itself on the verge of an extreme pitfall.
Traditionally the objective of people is self interest, maximization which may reduce the ability of communities to evolve in a green way. Consumers seek to maximize utility derived from consumption of goods and services. Producers ignore the associated externalities which include deforestation, pollution, dumping of waste, destruction of landscape, exploitation of marine resources. The relationship between human well being and ecosystem services is not linear. China achieved remarkable economic growth roles over the last decades to emerge of one of the largest economizer recently. China is among the top polluters in the world in terms of carbon dioxide and machines. For Nigeria to maintain its current economic growth path and sustain its drive for poverty reduction, oil exploitation and production will continue to be a dominant economic activity. This is also the case with a number of other developing countries. Developing countries desire industrialisation and economic growth and tend to consume more cheap energy. These act as evidence that the means of society on nature may not be easy to...

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