Indian Mathematician

Indian Mathematician

´╗┐Wheat and chessboard problem
The inventor of chess, an Indian mathematician showed the leader of his country his game (chess) and so the leader of the country asked him what he would like in return for this creation. The smart mathematician told his ruler that for the first square of the chess board he would like to receive a grain of wheat and then doubling after every square. In this activity the class had to learn and understand the relationship between the number of squares and the number of grains, to find out the relationship seven questions were conducted to investigate and answer they were answered using maths.
To discover the relationship between the number of squares and number of grains placed on each square the class had to undergo a series of questions.
In question number one we had to write how many grains of wheat the treasurer should put on each of the first 16 squares this was done by squaring each number by 2, as we went up the board so for example one grain of wheat would be placed on the first square of a chessboard, two on the second, four on the third, eight on the fourth and so on.
In the second question every individual had to make a table to show the relationship between the numbers of squares from 1-6 and the number of grains of wheat placed on each square this was done by multiplying two by the number of grains that were received for the square before. This gave everyone the answer for the relationship between the number of squares and grains. By completing the table the class discovered a general rule to make it easier to find out the number of grains on each square.
In question number three a graph was made using the table which had been answered in the question earlier by multiplying two by the number of grains that were received for the square before. The graph which was used to answer question number three was a line graph this let everyone find out the relationship between n and g, as the squares went up the grains of...

Similar Essays