makeup history

makeup history

´╗┐Roman philosopher Plautus (254-184 BC) wrote, "A woman without paint is like food without salt." Referring to women with makeup of course.
During the 1800's, women would use belladonna to make their eyes appear more luminous, even though they were aware it was poisonous.
Here are some beauty-tip recipes utilized during the late 1800's:
*For freckle removal: bruise and squeeze the juice out of chick-weed, add three times its quantity of soft water, then bathe the skin for five to ten minutes morning and evening.
*As a wash for the complexion: one teaspoon of flour of sulphur and a wine glassful of lime water, well shaken and mixed with half a wine-glass of glycerine and a wine-glass of rose-water. Rub on the face every night before going to bed.
*To keep hair from turning gray: four ounces of hulls of butternuts were infused with a quart of water, to which half an ounce of copperas was added. This was to be applied with a soft brush every two to three days.
*For wrinkle removal: melt one ounce of white wax, add two ounces of juice of lily-bulbs, two ounces of honey, two drams of rose-water, and a drop or two of ottar of roses and use twice a day.
early major developments include the use of castor oil in ancient Egypt as a protective balm and skin creams made of beeswax, olive oil, and rosewater. During the early 1900s, makeup was not excessively popular. In fact, women hardly wore makeup at all. Face enameling (applying actual paint to the face) became popular among the rich at this time in an attempt to look paler. This practice was dangerous due to the main ingredient often being Arsenic. Some women used burnt matchsticks to darken eyelashes, and geranium and poppy petals to stain the lips.[19] Vaseline became high in demand because it was used on chapped lips, as a base for hair tonic, and soap.
From 1939 to 1945, during the Second World War, cosmetics were in short supply.[30] Petroleum and alcohol, basic ingredients of many cosmetics, were...

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