Network_Topologies

Network_Topologies

´╗┐Christopher A. Lee Sr.
NT1310 Week 3 Assignment.Network Topology Paper

Network topology is the arrangement of the various elements (links, nodes, etc.) of a computer network.[1][2] Essentially, it is the topological[3] structure of a network, and may be depicted physically or logically. Physical topology refers to the placement of the network's various components, including device location and cable installation, while logical topology shows how data flows within a network, regardless of its physical design. Distances between nodes, physical interconnections, transmission rates, and/or signal types may differ between two networks, yet their topologies may be identical.
A good example is a local area network (LAN): Any given node in the LAN has one or more physical links to other devices in the network; graphically mapping these links results in a geometric shape that can be used to describe the physical topology of the network. Conversely, mapping the data flow between the components determines the logical topology of the network.
Contents
1 Topology
1.1 Point-to-point
1.2 Bus
1.3 Star
1.4 Ring
1.5 Mesh
1.6 Tree
1.6.1 Advantages
1.6.2 Disadvantages
1.7 Hybrid
1.8 Daisy chain
2 Centralization
3 Decentralization
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
Topology
There are two basic categories of network topologies:[4]
1. Physical topologies
2. Logical topologies
The shape of the cabling layout used to link devices is called the physical topology of the network. This refers to the layout of cabling, the locations of nodes, and the interconnections between the nodes and the cabling.[1] The physical topology of a network is determined by the capabilities of the network access devices and media, the level of control or fault tolerance desired, and the cost associated with cabling or telecommunications circuits.
The logical topology in contrast, is the way that the signals act on the network media, or the way that the data passes through...