Restoration of the Stuart Monarchy

Restoration of the Stuart Monarchy

Charles II lacked a desire for revenge upon those responsible for the death of his father. He agreed to pardons for all of the men involved except those who were immediately responsible for his father's murder (Durant 245). Charles even went so far as to go before Parliament to plead for early and merciful decisions on whom to execute and whom to spare. Parliament desired a much more severe vengeance, however, Charles was adamant about his decision on mercy (Durant 245). There were eighty-four men involved in the murder and dethroning of Charles I, only thirteen were sentenced to death by Charles II (Durant 245).

On January 30, 1661, in a morbid celebration of the anniversary of Charles I's murder, the body of Oliver Cromwell was exhumed and hung, in the manner of an execution (Durant 245). He was then beheaded, thereafter; his head was displayed for the duration of Charles II's reign atop Westminster Hall. His body was burned in the gallows, thus denying him peace in death (Durant 245).

Charles II was a very controversial king, one of the most controversial of his time, actually (Durant 247). It has been said the he lead one of the most scandalous lives of any king known to England (Durant 247). He was affectionately known as the great enemy of chastity and marriage (Godfrey 106). He had his first mistress when he was eighteen years old, while he was in exile during the overthrow of his father (Durant 249). He had numerous mistresses, some of which we know by name, and there is an even more select few that we know a history of. His first mistress was a woman named Lucy Walter. She gave birth to Charles's first son, James. Charles then abandoned her and his newborn son. While he was gone, Lucy became involved with another man. Charles later returned to Lucy, only to find her with another man. Charles felt betrayed and stripped Lucy of her social standing. She was forced in a life of prostitution, and died in 1658 of venereal...