rise and fall of roman empire

rise and fall of roman empire

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Roman Empire
Before his death, Emperor Flavius Theodosius divided the Roman Empire into two: the Western Roman Empire and the Eastern Roman Empire. The Western Roman Empire he placed under the rule of his younger son Flavius Honorius while the Eastern Roman Empire was also known as the Byzantine Empire he placed in the hands of older son Flavius Arcadius. The two sons ruled the empires separately with each depending on its resources for survival.
However, in the fourth century, the Western Roman Empire crumbled after ruling as one of the greatest superpowers. There are several factors that contributed to the fall of the Western Roman Empire some of which include the invasions by the Barbarian tribes. Rome had been in a constant tangle with the Germanic tribes. The barbarian groups like the Goths had encroached far beyond the Roman borders. In addition, the Visigoth King Alaric sacked the city of Rome. Finally, in 476 a revolt was staged by the Germanic leader that Odoacer that deposed the Roman Emperor Romulus Augustulus.
Another reason that led to the fall of the empire is due to overexpansion and military overspending. The Roman Empire covered a vast area which may also that may also have contributed to its fall. Having such a huge area to govern, the empire faced administrative and logistical problems. Despite having good road systems, they were unable to communicate efficiently and on time to manage their holdings. In addition, the empire faced difficulty in raising enough troops to manage the local rebellions and also defend its frontiers.
Finally, the rise of Christianity and the loss of the traditional Roman values also led to the fall of the Western Roman Empire. The rapid rise of Christianity in Rome ended the centuries of persecution and also eroded the long engraved traditional Roman values systems. Christianity shifted the focus from state glory into a single deity and also replaced Roman polytheistic religion...

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