scientific revolutions

scientific revolutions

´╗┐SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION INVENTIONS
13-1976 Julie Damaris
Daystar University

BUS 213A: Research Methods
Submitted to:
Mrs. Mwamba


Department of Commerce
School of Business and Economics
February 8, 2016
1. Archimedes Principle
It states that the buoyant force is equal to the weight of the displaced water. If the weight of the water displaced is less than the weight of the object, the object will sink. Otherwise the object will float, with the weight of the water displaced equal to the weight of the object.
Archimedes (287-212 BC) was a prolific ancient Greek mathematician. Archimedes invented the water screw, a device for raising water using an encased screw open at both ends. The screw is set at an angle, and as the screw turns, water fills the air pockets and is transported upwards. The Archimedes screw is still in use today. Among his many accomplishments was the first description of the lever (around 260 BC). Levers are one of the basic tools; they were probably used in prehistoric times. Many of our basic tools use levers, including scissors (two class-1 levers), pliers (two class-1 levers), hammer claws (one class-1 lever), nutcrackers (two class-2 levers), and tongs (two class-3 levers).
Archimedes` principle explains why steel ships float.
2. Bernoulli`s Principle
It states that as the speed of a moving fluid increases, the pressure within the fluid decreases. Bernoulli`s Law has many applications in real life: Bernoulli's Law is used when designing the Venturi throat, a constricted region in the air passage of a car motor's carburetor that causes a reduction in pressure, and in turn causes fuel vapor to be drawn out of the carburetor bowl.
The design of airplane wings take advantage of the knowledge we gleaned from Bernoulli's Law: these wings are designed to create an area of fast flowing air on its upper surface, which cause pressure near this area to drop and thus pull the wing upward.
Finally, we've all experienced Bernoulli's...

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