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Nfl Concussions

Nfl Concussions

  • Submitted By: mdlee3
  • Date Submitted: 12/07/2010 11:31 PM
  • Category: Miscellaneous
  • Words: 2004
  • Page: 9
  • Views: 1

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The life of an NFL player is not always publicity, riches, and Sunday’s big game. Imagine being forced to retire from the life of a professional athlete because of a concussion, which may lead to an excruciating future of pain, and possible death. Kyle Turley retired from the NFL in 2007 after seven years playing professionally, and painfully expresses, “ ‘My back injury pretty much ruined my career…and my concussion situation is ruining my life’ ”(qtd. in Jost Overview). The NFL’s retired players, current players and staff face indifference about player injuries, and their return time, specifically concussions and head impacts. Ira Casson former co-chair, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, unsympathetically states: “ ‘Association does not prove causation’ ” (qtd. in Jost Pro/Con). While most opponents in favor of addressing the issue feel there is no connection between brain damage and long term injuries, and do not see any reason for changing the game. The NFL faces an issue concerning its players’ health and safety being in jeopardy due to threatening injuries, which may lead to long term brain disease; however some feel that there is no direct evidence connecting football and brain damage which would warrant changes to the game.
While the 1990s brought scandal and drug abuse concerns to the NFL, the 2000s brought another concern to the sport in relation to players’ health and safety, concussions. This issue regarding NFL players, and the violent hits taken in the league were not addressed until 2001. A NFL paper announced high concussion incidents, and in 2003 a second paper was published, and addressed an expanded range of issues including depression. During the surrounding years the death of players such as Mike Webster in 2002 and Terry Long in 2005, were due to CTE also known as chronic traumatic encephopathy. Sean Gregory, a writer for Time magazine explains America’s obsession about the NFL, and football in general...

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