Supreme God of the Olympians

Supreme God of the Olympians

´╗┐Supreme god of the Olympians, Zeus was the father of Perseus and Heracles, the latter of whom once wrestled him to a draw. Zeus was the youngest son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. When he was born, his father Cronus intended to swallow him as he had all of Zeus's siblings: Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter and Hera. But Rhea hid the newborn in a cave on Mount Dicte in Crete. Zeus was important because he was the god of gods, anything he says goes. He earned his power by titans the ruler the universe. Their chief was Cronus. He and his wife Rhea had five children, but because Cronus had been warned that one of his children would overthrow him, he devoured each child as soon as it was born. Zeus was the sixth. As soon as he grew up he was ready to over through his father and avenge his siblings. And he did.
After the glorious victory of the Olympian gods over the Titans, Mother Earth Gaea became very angry with Zeus, the King of the Olympian Gods, because she felt that he had treated her sons, the Titans, unjustly. Gaea therefore unified with Tartarus (the symbol of the depths of the Underworld) to create a devastating monster which was meant to destroy Zeus and take his place. They gave the monster the name "Typhoeus" (Typhon). Typhon had frightful features and enormous powers. Soon, he attacked the home of the gods, flaming rocks at it, hissing, screaming and gushing mighty streams of fire from his mouth. The bare sight of the creature was enough for the Olympian gods to run away scared and flee to Egypt, where they transformed into animals. When Athena, the goddess of wisdom, accused Zeus for cowardness, he decided to confront Typhon. Armed with thunder and lightnings, he struck at the monster with a sickle and then chased him until Mount Casion, which rises over Syria. Seeing Typhon severely wounded, Zeus engaged him in a hand-to-hand combat. But all at once, Typhon wrapped Zeus in his coils, held him firmly and wrested the sickle from him. Typhon soon left...

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