Motivational theories

Motivational theories

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Motivation Concepts Table
Use the following table to complete the Motivation Concept Table assignment for Week One. You are encouraged to modify table formatting to suit your needs. Please consult with course instructor for additional assignment specifications. The completed table will serve as a resource for the remainder of the course.


Theory Name

Major Theorist(s)
Time Period Created

Key Theory Concepts


Descartes

1637

Will motivates all actions. Will initiates and directs action.

Will

Ruckmick

1936

Striving to create impulses to act. The ability to resist self-denial or resisting temptation.


Rand

1964

Decides whether or not to act.


Instinct


Darwin


1859-1872

Behavior is unlearned, automated and mechanistic. Biological urges impulses and appetites.



Woodworth

1918
The function of behavior was to serve bodily needs.

Drive

Freud

1915
All behavior was motivated to serve the satisfaction of needs.



Hull


1943, 1952
Drive is a physiological basis and bodily need is the ultimate basis of motivation and could be predicted before it occurred.


Sheffield and Roby

1950
Learning can occur when there is no equivalent experience of drive decline.


Harlow

1953
Learning occurs when there is a drive reductions and well as an increase in drive.
Decline of Drive Theory

Klien

1954
Motivation can result from something other than bodily disturbances.


Bolles

1972
A decrease in drive is not necessary for learning to occur.


Bolles

1975
Had the dominant perspective on motivation.


Berlyne

1967


Optimal level of arousal.


Hebb

1955

Post-Drive Theory Years

Olds

1969

Pleasure centers in the brain.


Miller

1948, 1959

Approach and avoidance conflicts, conditioned motives.


Murray

1938

Universal needs.


Rogers

1959

Self-actualization.

Motivation Mini-Theory...

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