acient appeals

acient appeals

  • Submitted By: meyadavis
  • Date Submitted: 11/02/2015 2:39 PM
  • Category: English
  • Words: 1227
  • Page: 5

Ekaterina Romanenko
Dr. Orion Ussner Kidder
English 100: Academic Writing
25 September 2015
Personal aspect as a tool of essay writing
no extra space here
A The famous British writer, George Orwell, constructed his essay, ’’Why I Write,’’ so
that its structure, tone, and some background information compel the readers to believe his words
unconsciously. It This effect is achieved by integrating on of personal aspects into these three
components of the essay.
good opening! very clear

When recalling something from the past, a person can notice that those memories are
deeply set in the mindset that is which are based on an y emotional experience. Such memories
are brighter than just mechanically memorized statements because they leave any kind of

I think you mean “a stronger”
impression, yes?

impression. Same is The same is true with reading. A person will pay more attention to the text
that could touches his or her feelings.

These principles (let’s call
them that) should go in the next
paragraph, where they support
your point.

Orwell’s essay gets very emotional from the very beginning. The story of a little boy is
sympathetic as he is described [by whom?] as a lonely and not very successful one. However, the
more important thing, here, is the way in which the story is told. Sincerity is a key word here.
Orwell is not scared to say that his first poem ’’was a plagiarism of Blake's ‘Tiger, Tiger’

this word doesn’t carry any
real information, so avoid it in
favour of something that
connects your two ideas, instead
of just saying “here’s another
Also, how do you know they’re
“true” feelings? They could just be
very convincing lies. If you
explain where this sense of truth
comes from, then you’re not
saying it is true, only that it feels
true, and why, which is very

’’ (Orwell 1). Moreover, he reveals his true feelings and thoughts in this essay. It could seem first
that he was dextrous at all...

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