Welcome! AllFreeEssays.com is now Brainia.com. Same services, new name! Any questions or comments on this change? Contact Us .

60 Free Essays on Describe London

  1. Compare the Ways in Which William Wordsworth Presents London in ‘Upon Westminster Bridge’ with William Blake's View of London in His Poem ‘London’

    because of helplessness while living in London, In contrast to this Wordsworth visualised London early in the morning over the top of Westminster Bridge, only seeing the beauty London’s wearing over itself, the words he uses to describe the things he saw is ‘ The beauty of the morning: silent, bare...

  2. island man

    themes explored in Island man by Grace Nichols are Cultural identity, the difficulty of belonging to 2 cultures, feeling separated from home and not being able to distinguish dream from reality. Cultural Identity is shown when she describes the island and London, emphasising her description of...

  3. Nature Feels No Pain

    neither mercy nor sorrow for human arrogance. Nature will always win. Jack London does two things very well in “To Build A Fire”: describes both the living and non-living aspects of nature, and the natural inclination of ignorance among humans. He describes the non-living aspects of nature beautifully...

  4. Poetry Comparison

    - the river is natural however there is a feeling of autonomous power and status towards it. On the other hand "London" is the complete opposite of the first poem and describes the river as "chartered", implying the river and London in general are restricted because the rivers path is planned and fixed...

  5. Compare and Contrast the Presentation of the City in London and Composed Upon Westminter Bridge

    describes more of the city. In the first line he describes how the sun is shining and soaking the city. In the next line he compares the city to nature he uses a list of valley, rock and hill. This is his first splendour, what he knows about most and to compare the city of London with it must mean he...

  6. How Far Does T. S. Eliot’s the Waste Land Present a Realistic Picture of London After the First World War?

    . The third example follows the encounter between the clerk and the typist. It begins with a brief reference to the pure romantic love of “Elizabeth and Leicester” – what Craig describes as Eliot’s “glamourising view of Spenser’s London, Elizabethan England with its pure rivers and stately ways...

  7. The Sun and Guardian- Low Level 5

    How do the following newspapers, the Sun and the Guardian use different techniques to present their account of the London riots, and to what effect? Introduction In this essay I will be exploring the two newspapers-The sun and the guardian. The two newspapers describe the London riots. The London...

  8. Victorian London Lessons

    resources.indd 1 24/08/2010 10:19:05 Scheme of work| KS2 In Little Dorrit, Charles Dickens describes a London rain storm: In the country, the rain would have developed a thousand fresh scents, and every drop would have had its bright association with some beautiful form of growth or life. In...

  9. Essay

    London whose captains sided with Berkeley and the loyalists first suppressed the rebellion. Government forces from England arrived soon after and spent several years defeating pockets of resistance and reforming the colonial government to one more directly under royal control. Describe the...

  10. Business Plan International

    business model. It will also discuss prospects for making HB Proper a multinational business expanding into London, a financial tech hub of Europe. Most information here is a truncated version of HB Proper International Business Strategy, the original document that discusses an outward and international...

  11. Barbiegal

    describes the gravestones as “Five little lozenges”. In the second paragraph Dickens creates a very bleak environment. He does this by using descriptions like “the dark black wilderness” Charles Dickens was born on 7th February 1812. At the age of 12 Dickens went to a private school in London...

  12. The Utopian Society

    Does Utopia describe an ideal society? Thomas More was born in London in 1477. More had an extensive education and rose quickly through the Government hierarchy and attained high office. In May 1515 he was appointed to a delegation to help revise an Anglo-Flemish commercial treaty. During...

  13. The Use of Powerful Imagery

    Blake and Wordsworth both use powerful imagery to present their views on London, however the imagery the poets uses creates two very different pictures. Blake’s uses a lot of negative imagery to portray once more his anger towards the government and Monarchy, and further describe the depression...

  14. William Blake's London

    of London, where Blake writes, "I wandered through each chartered street/Near where the chartered Thames does flow/A mark in every face I meet/Marks of weakness, marks of woe.…. In every voice, in every ban/The mind-forged manacles I hear". The way Blake describes the oppressed as having a mark of...

  15. Eye Witness

    author’s purpose, the achievement of their purpose, and the authors focus. - Purpose for Writing London’s purpose for writing is to describe the destruction of San Francisco from the earthquake and fire. London describes the effects the disasters had on the city. For example, “The earthquake shook...

  16. Bleak

    In the opening passage of the novel Bleak House, Charles Dickens denounces that the legal system of the 19th century was tainted with corruption and vacillation. Dickens conveys his detestation of the legal system by using alliteration to describe the "fog" that surrounds London, imagery of the...

  17. Painting

    . IMAGE-BASED DISCUSSION • Take a close look at André Derain’s London Bridge and describe what you see, using a variety of different words. How would you describe it to someone who has never seen it? Make a list of five to ten adjectives that apply to this painting. • What kind of city do you...

  18. Mr Alessandro Tomei

    LONDON The poem describes the city of London at the end of XVIII century, during the industrial revolution. Every place is chartered , from the streets to the Thames. The poet uses the metaphor of the "mind forg'd manacles" with 2 different meanings. The first one means that the imprisonment is...

  19. The Two Sides of England

    . Blake describes life in the city, as “an ugly and terrifying one of poverty, disease, prostitution, war, and social, institutional, sexual repression, epitomized in the ghastly representation of London” (Sayers 3). “London” begins with the speaker describing the sights he sees as he walks...

  20. "London" Poem Essay

    , symbols, images, sound, rhyme, rhythm and meter to express this strong message of political and social importance. The title of the poem establishes the setting in London and describes the social environment that shows the city’s residents and their surroundings. The title designates the exact...

  21. Poop

    addition, he uses the metaphor of “mind-forged manacles” to describe things that imprison people and this gives a sense of restriction and lack of freedom (possibly self imprisonment from thought). Furthermore, William Blake presents a strong sense of selfishness about London because he wrote “how...

  22. Pre Century London

    to describe the constant moving and growing of London, ‘endless stream of men and moving things’. This metaphor represents London as a stream, always flowing. This is one of the two uses of metaphors throughout the poem; the other is ‘when winds blow loud’. I think this metaphor describes the people...

  23. William Wordsworth

    Westminster, Middlesex bank, and Lambeth, Surrey bank in what is now Greater London, England. The content of the poem describes how the persona of the poem contemplates the beauty of the morning of London from the Westminster Brigde. He describes how everything at sunrise looks splended. Wordsworth uses...

  24. How Would You Compare Blake’s Poems “the Garden of Love”, “the Chimney Sweeper” and “London?”

    hidden meanings in the poem “The Chimney Sweeper” and “London”. Blake describes the parents as bad parents for they don’t look after their child. “They are both gone up to the church to pray”. On one level this could mean they have actually gone to church to pray leaving the child by himself. However...

  25. papers

    speaker would think, "Oh. Now it's just London again. Been there, seen that." (There we go with our skepticism again.) Lines 5-7 silent, bare, Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie Open unto the fields, and to the sky; In general terms, the speaker describes some of the sights that...

  26. personal development

    following questions in your analysis: Subject : What is in the image, what is the photograph/drawing/painting/advert of? Describe in objective detail Form: How is it composed, arranged, and constructed visually, i.e. what makes up its formal elements? angle, point of view, sharp or out of focus...

  27. Island Man Essay

    metallic soar” This illustrates each word in a different way, “grey” meaning dull and bland; “metallic” equally describing the buildings as polished and slick. Lastly “soar”defines the buildings high or tall like skyscrapers. Many a time the colours used to describe London reflect on how he hates the fast...

  28. Wr on Terror

    that Mr Dickens’s genius is especially suited to the delineation of city life. He describes London like a special correspondent for posterity.’ Walter Bagehot. Many readers would endorse this. However, I want to explore the London presented by Dickens in terms of right and wrong distorted...

  29. London

    readers mind, but more importantly to express the emotional significance behind the events taking place. Blake accuses the government of failing to serve the people of London and it has a large impact on his life. Blake describes the sorrow of the Industrial Revolution and the breaking of the...

  30. The Story of an Eyewitness Analysis

    , London expresses emphases on the fire that caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage. He uses a metaphor to describe what he saw, “San Francisco's burning was a lurid tower visible a hundred miles away.” Next, he uses personification to illustrate his picture, “and for three days and nights...